Civilians

The Impact of War on Civilians

Civilians bear the brunt of wars today, with the majority of casualties in present day conflicts being non-combatants. The lives of civilians are also affected by a number of other factors, with the damage often persisting long after war has ended.

Dr Daniele Viliunas

Position within MAPW: 
Coordinator, Queensland Branch
Contact: 

qld [at] mapw [dot] org [dot] au
or via MAPW Executive Officer: (03) 9023 1958 or 0431 475 465

Professional Qualifications: 
MD
Current field of medicine: 

Psychiatry

Special areas of interest: 
Dr Viliunas plays an active role in MAPW's international work with IPPNW
Background: 

Dr Viliunas has taught at both secondary and post-graduate level, in Arts, Science, Environmental and Psychological Medicine; performed regular medical segments on radio and television; served on the Psychologists Board of Queensland, consulted to the Medical Board of Queensland, and provided mentoring and professional supervision. These experiences have all facilitated her appreciation of the subtlety and potency of legitimate authority and its capacity to influence in education and change. Dr. Viliunas' work has been in indigenous and trans-cultural medicine, psychiatry, specialist psychotherapy and medical ethics. Very different personal and cultural understandings of the interplay of heart, mind, spirit, society and place are everywhere. Yet the universality of human experience remains a fundamental motivator in her work with MAPW.

Dr Sue Wareham OAM

Position within MAPW: 
President and ACT Branch Coordinator
Contact: 

sue [dot] wareham [at] mapw [dot] org [dot] au
or via MAPW Executive Officer: (03) 9023 1958 or 0431 475 465

Current field of medicine: 

Dr Wareham is a general practitioner in Canberra.

Special areas of interest: 
Dr Wareham has a broad range of expertise. Her recent focus with MAPW has been on Australia's military strategy; and on the environmental costs of war. She is also an expert on the hazards of the nuclear industry.
Background: 

Dr Sue Wareham first became involved in MAPW over 20 years ago out of a "horror at the destructive capacity of a single nuclear weapon." Sue notes that "millions of innocent people are still threatened by these weapons". Sue believes that her work with MAPW is fundamental to her commitment to the protection of human life and the improvement of human well-being. In 2007 Dr Wareham co-authored a MAPW report on the use of cluster munitions in Lebanon.She has been awarded the Order of Australia Medal for her work for peace.

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