Radiation

Radiation and its effects

Radiation

When we talk about "radiation", this is often shorthand for ionising radiation.

Over the past 70 years, human exposure to ionising radiation has increased because of nuclear weapons explosions and the nuclear industry. Ionising radiation is harmful to humans. It can cause cancers as well as damage to human DNA which can damage the health of future generations.

MAPW fact sheet: Nuclear power and childhood leukaemia. October 2008

New evidence clearly demonstrates that living close to a nuclear power station increases the risk for children of developing leukaemia. MAPW's fact sheet summarises and provides the major references - a recent German study, and a new meta-analysis - on childhood leukaemia and nuclear power. (Or childhood leukemia, so this is found by US spellers).

NZ nuclear veterans' long term chromosome damage: Rowland 2008

"Elevated chromosome translocation frequencies in New Zealand nuclear test veterans", by Associate Professor Al Rowland and other Massey University researchers, is a significant study documenting health effects for NZ sailors who witnessed Britain's Grapple nuclear tests at Christmas Island in the 1950s.

Dr Peter Karamoskos

Position within MAPW: 
Treasurer
Contact: 

peter [at] mapw [dot] org [dot] au or via Executive Officer: (03) 9023 1958 or 0431 475 465

Professional Qualifications: 
MBBS; FRANZCR
Current field of medicine: 

Nuclear radiologist

Special areas of interest: 
Health effects of radiation, including low level radiation; proliferation dangers of highly enriched uranium in nuclear medicine
Background: 

MAPW Treasurer Dr Peter Karamoskos has worked in clinical practice for 23 years, and as a nuclear radiologist for 13 years. He represents the Australian public on the Radiation Health Committee of Australia's nuclear safety agency ARPANSAi. Dr Karamoskos has written widely on the health risks of ionising radiation and of the nuclear industry. He is available for expert comment on issues including nuclear power, radiation and safety in the nuclear industry.
 

Associate Professor Tilman Ruff

Position within MAPW: 
Co-President, IPPNW
Contact: 

tilman [dot] a [dot] ruff [at] mapw [dot] org [dot] au 
or via MAPW Executive Officer: (03) 9023 1958 or 0431 475 465

Professional Qualifications: 
MB, BS (Hons); FRACP
Current field of medicine: 

Tilman Ruff is an infectious diseases and public health physician; Associate Professor in the Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne; medical advisor for the International Department of Australian Red Cross; and technical advisor on immunisation in Pacific island countries for UNICEFi and AusAID.

Special areas of interest: 
Nuclear weapons, biological weapons, nuclear power and the links between civil and military nuclear industries. Iraq.
Background: 

Associate Professor Tilman Ruff is Co-President of International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNWi, Nobel Peace prize 1985);  a member of the National Council, and former President,  of the Medical Association for Prevention of War (Australia); Australian Management Committee member and IPPNWi Working Group Chair, for the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICANi).

 

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